On Lawsuits for Licenses: The Fight for Women’s Wrestling in New York (long-form)

In time for Labor Day, the very long-form version of my post on gender-based discrimination and its role in the legislative history of the women’s wrestling ban in New York.

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On Lawsuits for Licenses: The Fight for Women’s Wrestling in New York, part 4

The New York State Athletic Commission’s history of records management contains as many twists and turns as anything seen in a wrestling ring. Commission meeting minutes, from 1920 to 1977, went missing from the agency’s office in the late 1970s and eventually appeared in the International Boxing Hall of Fame’s collection about a decade later. Neither the Commission nor the State of New York knew about it until 1998.

Continue reading “On Lawsuits for Licenses: The Fight for Women’s Wrestling in New York, part 4”

On Lawsuits for Licenses: The Fight for Women’s Wrestling in New York, part 3

If any one person in wrestling was a particular thorn in the side of the New York State Athletic Commission in the mid-20th century, it might be Pedro Martinez. Not only did he argue against the Commission regarding its policies towards professional wrestling, he also challenged them on the women’s wrestling ban and specifically called it a violation of civil rights.

Continue reading “On Lawsuits for Licenses: The Fight for Women’s Wrestling in New York, part 3”

On the Peking One Last Time: A Trip to the Seaport Museum

Yesterday I toured the barque Peking, berthed at Pier 17 at the South Street Seaport Museum, for the very last time. Unlike the dozens upon dozens of tours I’ve done long ago, I’m not leading this one. I’m here to say goodbye to the old girl before she leaves the Seaport for good and departs for her home port of Hamburg, Germany. I can’t just go up … Continue reading On the Peking One Last Time: A Trip to the Seaport Museum

On Lawsuits for Licenses: The Fight for Women’s Wrestling in New York, part 2

This is part 2 of a multi-post essay on the legislative history of the ban on women’s wrestling in New York State. Part 1 may be read here. Part 3 will be published next week.

Sources not linked or mentioned in text are numbered and can be found at the bottom.

Continue reading “On Lawsuits for Licenses: The Fight for Women’s Wrestling in New York, part 2”

On Lawsuits for Licenses: The Fight for Women’s Wrestling in New York, part 1

This is the first post of a multi-part essay on the legislative history of the New York State Athletic Commission’s ban on women’s professional wrestling and its overturn in 1972. I didn’t think my research would ever have any relevance to anything  or anyone other than a die-hard feminist wrestling history nerd. I was wrong.

Continue reading “On Lawsuits for Licenses: The Fight for Women’s Wrestling in New York, part 1”

On the Hudson Valley Ruins at the New York State Museum

An exhibition based on Robert Yasinsac and Thomas Rinaldi’s  Hudson Valley Ruins: Forgotten Landmarks of an American Landscape opened at the New York State Museum on August 20. It’s a photographic exhibition on the decaying — but still interestingly beautiful — industrial, commercial, residential and medical buildings (among others) that have been abandoned and left to time and the elements in the Hudson Valley region. The … Continue reading On the Hudson Valley Ruins at the New York State Museum

Finding Aid Friday: Newspaper Morgue Edition

Gawker is dead. Long live Gawker! I am theoretically pouring one out for the site that broke the monotony of endless staple-removing sessions and kept me from weeping with boredom back when I was an active archivist. Since the future of Gawker’s archive is still up in the air, this edition of Finding Aid Friday is dedicated to newspaper morgues. May they all be fully … Continue reading Finding Aid Friday: Newspaper Morgue Edition

On Tex’s Return to the Garden

See that dapper fellow in front of Madison Square Garden’s marquee? The monochromatic dude on the right. That’s Tex Rickard. I may have mentioned him before. He used to be my favorite promoter before I dumped him for his former matchmaker. But I still have a soft spot for the guy. An organization dedicated to increasing and/or improving knowledge of 34th street in Midtown Manhattan put up this … Continue reading On Tex’s Return to the Garden

On the Other Side of the Window: Being an Archives Researcher

It’s different being a researcher in an archive as opposed to being an archivist in your own archive. I guess it can be likened to being a guest in someone’s home in a different country and culture: You’re not sure where things are, what exactly you’re supposed to do, or what’s going to happen. You just hope to not fumble around like an idiot or break things. … Continue reading On the Other Side of the Window: Being an Archives Researcher